Monday, April 21, 2014

Amanuensis Monday - Grandma Hill's Poetry, Week 33


Strikes

When our country was threatened by an outside Joe
Uncle Sam did not ask our boys if they wished to go.
Leave their homes, wives, children and jobs with good pay.
But took them at a much less wage, they had nothing to say.

But when of money won’t cooperate, refuse to play ball

He seems to be helpless and does nothing at all.






Nancy Jane Wiley Hill (1875-1960) was always writing something.  Many of those poems are now in the possession of her granddaughter Shirley Kern.  Shirley, with the help of her sister-in-law Ruth Ormsby, transcribed these poems in 1996 for a Hill-Ormsby-Kern family reunion.  I am going to post many of these poems so that they may be enjoyed by all.

These are copyright 1996 and reprinted with permission.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Society Saturday - Hosting the Magna Carta

Lineage Week began for me this year at the Rendezvous of the Women Descendants of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company.

This group of ladies met for a business meeting during the day, then relaxed at the banquet that evening.  Our banquet speaker was Robert Newlen.  He is the assistant Law Librarian for the Library of Congress.  His topic was about the Magna Carta, which is coming to the LOC this year.  The Magna Carta will celebrate its 800th anniversary in 2015.  The LOC will have an exhibition featuring one of only three original 1215 copies of this document.

Mr. Newlen showing a slide of the Magna Carta

Mr. Newlen spoke a little about the history of the Magna Carta, some facts about the various copies, and told of the preparations surrounding the exhibit.  When asked how the document would travel, he stated that it flies first class with its own escort.

This was an interesting start to this busy week in Washington DC.

The Illinois delegation to A&H Rendezvous

http://blogs.loc.gov/law/2014/03/magna-carta-is-coming-to-the-library-of-congress/

Monday, April 14, 2014

Amanuensis Monday - Grandma Hill's Poetry, Week 32

My Second War

I am only an aging grandmother
My heart torn with grief and pain
When I think of another grim war
Coming so close to my home again

After my great loss in the last war
I had learned to hide my sorrows
And think of my many grandsons
To cheer and comfort my tomorrows.

But again, grim war, in more dealy and terrible might,
Has called my grandsons to fight for freedom and right
No difference how great my dread, I won’t ask them
to delay the call.
For someone must fight to end this terrible curse,
this time for all.

All I can ask is, they may fight
With valor, a lasting peace to gain.
And if they fall, may God grant the right

That this time, ‘twill not have been in vain.

Note: Four of Grandma Hill's grandsons enlisted during World War II - they were:

Charles Victor Hill - Corporal in Army
Robert Leroy Kern - Sr. Chief Boatswain's Mate in Navy
Donald Edward Ormsby - Airman 1st Class in Army Air Corps
Charles Victor Ormsby - Private in Army

In addition, two of her granddaughters' husbands served:

Donald Earl Vail - Sergeant in Marines
William H. Watkins - 3rd Class Petty Officer in Coast Guard

Thus, all branches of service were represented, and all her "boys" came home safely this time.





Nancy Jane Wiley Hill (1875-1960) was always writing something.  Many of those poems are now in the possession of her granddaughter Shirley Kern.  Shirley, with the help of her sister-in-law Ruth Ormsby, transcribed these poems in 1996 for a Hill-Ormsby-Kern family reunion.  I am going to post many of these poems so that they may be enjoyed by all.

These are copyright 1996 and reprinted with permission.

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Society Saturday - Kentucky in the War of 1812

The Illinois State Society of US Daughters 1812 had Eddie Price as our speaker for our state meeting.  He is the author of "Widder's Landing" - historical fiction set in early 19th century Kentucky.

Author Eddie Price in costume, telling about Kentucky's role in the War of 1812
He had done quite a bit of research in preparation for the book and he shared some of his findings with us.
For instance:

  • Kentuckians participated in all battles of the War of 1812 from Thames in the north, to New Orleans in the south, as well as all points in between
  • Of those killed in all War of 1812 battles, 64% were from Kentucky
  • 30 of the 120 counties in Kentucky are named for War of 1812 heroes
  • Kentucky played a major role in the battle of New Orleans, comprising 25% of Jackson's U.S. forces; unfortunately, only 1 in 3 had a decent weapon.

Monday, April 07, 2014

Amanuensis Monday - Grandma Hill's Poetry, Week 31

There was a man who had a little cow
And the cow had a wee short tail.
Each morn and evening, even until now
They milk the milk in a large pail.

He has two girls who own a cat with spots on her back
And of this milk, they never allow her to lack.

For every Mickey Mouse she’d spy, running to and fro.







Nancy Jane Wiley Hill (1875-1960) was always writing something.  Many of those poems are now in the possession of her granddaughter Shirley Kern.  Shirley, with the help of her sister-in-law Ruth Ormsby, transcribed these poems in 1996 for a Hill-Ormsby-Kern family reunion.  I am going to post many of these poems so that they may be enjoyed by all.

These are copyright 1996 and reprinted with permission.

Saturday, April 05, 2014

Society Saturday - Yea, we have a Goodly History

The Lac des Illinois and Robert Hempstead Chapters of the Colonial Dames Seventeenth Century held a join meeting.  The special guest was the State President, Nancy Schultz.  She must visit each of Illinois' seven chapters during her two year term.  Members from both chapters held their business meetings.  There were some new and some prospective members present, as well as some members from out of state chapters.

After our business was concluded, and after lunch, President Schultz gave her program "Yea, We Have a Goodly History".  This was about the founding of the National Society by Mary Florence Taney in 1915.  The Society will be celebrating its 100th anniversary next year.  Since its founding by 5 women, it has grown to over 11000 members with the following goals:
     - preservation of records and historical sites
     - to foster interest in historical colonial research
     - to aid in education of our youth
     - to commemorate noble and heroic deeds of our ancestors, the founds of our great Republic
     - to maintain a Library of Heraldry
     - to develop a library specializing in seventeenth century American colonial data




http://www.colonialdames17c.org/illinois.html

Monday, March 31, 2014

Amanuensis Monday - Grandma Hill's Poetry, Week 30


Mickey Mouse! Mickey Mouse!
Please don’t come to my house.
For I don’t think it would be fair
To scare me, ‘till I’d run and jump on a chair.

And every bit of bread and cheese,
I’d put upon my cupboard shelf
You would not even say “Please”
But eat it your own greedy self.

And my Dolly’s nice dresses
I’d put away as her best;
You’d chipple into nasty messes,
And then make your nest.

So, Mickey Mouse, please listen to that
Or I’ll tell my  old spotted cat.
And she’ll spring on you and make you go wee
Then take you home for her kittens to see.

And then to her kittens she’d say
Now wash your faces and look very fine
For on poor Mickey Mouse today
We are going to dine.

Note:  Similar theme as last week - I think she may have been fighting with mice when she wrote these.






Nancy Jane Wiley Hill (1875-1960) was always writing something.  Many of those poems are now in the possession of her granddaughter Shirley Kern.  Shirley, with the help of her sister-in-law Ruth Ormsby, transcribed these poems in 1996 for a Hill-Ormsby-Kern family reunion.  I am going to post many of these poems so that they may be enjoyed by all.

These are copyright 1996 and reprinted with permission.